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A classic Cleveland "old-man" bar with a totally modern vibe, this well-run tavern offers a full bar and plenty of tasty noshes, ranging from roasted red pepper hummus to a humongous burger. Nightly happy hours help make this a popular destination.
Channeling the spirit of a European wine bar, this funky little spot in Ohio City makes a tasty backdrop for a small but tempting menu of thin-crusted pizzas, house-cured meats, handmade pastas, and some of the best twice-fried, Belgian-style fries you'll ever find on a Cleveland tabletop. To go with, the annotated wine list offers 100 selections, while next door's Bier Markt provides dozens of imported brews.
During daylight hours, this anchor of the Warehouse District party scene masquerades as a simple bar and restaurant. But on any weekend, the place becomes a holding pen for a unique cross section of clubbers, from gel-headed fratsters to hip-hoppers to suited execs.
Classic American-style diner food is the star at Big Egg. While most days, the hours are a reasonable 6 a.m. to 9 a.m., an around-the-clock schedule is observed on Fridays and Saturdays, making it the ideal spot for sobering up after last call at nearby bars and clubs.
Besides offering the usual takeout options, this storefront pizza palace supplies the eats for Hotz Café, next door’s vintage tavern, thereby solving the problem of how to entertain your buds when the apartment’s a mess and the beer is all gone. For a touch of class, a buttery half-head of roasted garlic sits in the center of all the thick-crusted specialty pizzas. Ribs, chicken and salads are available too, along with bar noshes like fried pickles and wings.
The club's logo -- a porker in a tie -- says it all. Down and dirty, but still kind of chic, the large, open Pig caters to an older, rock-oriented crowd, with cover bands. Never a cover.
Well-prepared fresh seafood is the specialty at this beautifully renovated space in the Warehouse District. Don't miss Blue Point chowder or the grouper over lobster-mashed potatoes.
Come to Bo Loong to sample some of the city's most authentic dim sum — tiny sweet-and-savory dumplings, buns, and tarts whose name translates as "dot the heart." If you order from the menu, consider the golden, pan-fried noodles, topped with seafood, meats or vegetables. Dim sum is served daily, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bo Loong is open until 2 a.m. on weekdays and 3 a.m. on weekends.
The menu at chef Nate Williams' Ohio City sandwich shop is as crisp as an album's track list. Just eight giant sammies: no soups, no sides, no desserts. All the meats are marinated, brined, and roasted in-house, and the drippings from each are reserved for use as gravy. Most of the sandwiches are modeled after classic American varieties and can be had drenched in jus or topped with chips for crunch. Best of all, the shop stays open until 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Mainly carryout.
Award-winning pastry chef Courtney Bonning branches out into the savory world at this cute-as-a-cupcake café. Like a big-city patisserie, the café is intimate, elegant, and attractive enough to warrant a visit every day. In addition to the delectable sweets, the café dishes up breakfast, lunch, and weekend brunch. Quiche of the day, meat-filled Cornish pasties, and a killer Ohio beef burger are just a few of the offerings.
Brothers has grown away from its funky blues-club vibe of days past. Now it features three rooms: a restaurant/tavern, a wine bar that specializes in acoustic sounds, and the roomy Music Hall, which hosts rock, blues, jazz, and reggae acts.
Stepping into this cozy neighborhood ristorante — with its wooden bar, linoleum floors, and menu of pizza, pasta, and assorted parmigianas, cacciatores, and marsalas — is like traveling back in time to the days when Italian restaurateurs baked their own breads, made their own pastas, and served it all in charming, intimate spaces. Almost everything on the “full-meal deal” menu is delish. But when it comes to fried calamari and baked lasagna, Bruno’s scores among the very best.
The menu’s nothing fancy, composed mostly of pasta, a few sandwiches, a simple pizza, and some pastries. And while the surroundings are clean and comfy, the amenities are homey at best. But when you and a bud each can snare an ample portion of spaghetti with homemade meatballs and share a freshly stuffed cannoli, and still get change from a $20, that’s what we call a bargain. Beer and wine are available.
Commuters who missed the upscale breakfast-and-lunch options at Juniper Grille can take comfort in Carnegie Kitchen, which seems to have picked up where that diner left off. Chef-owner Jeff Uniatowski, formerly of Mise and House of Blue, crafts a value-driven menu with broad appeal. Contemporary versions of diner classics like steak and eggs, corned beef hash and bagels and lox give way to chopped salads, mile-high Reubens, and grilled-salmon sandwiches.
Downtown breakfast spots are rare, and handsome downtown breakfast spots with free parking are rarer still. But that's what you'll find at Carnegie Kitchen — along with a value-driven menu with broad appeal.
The main attraction at this downtown bar and grill is the 40 beers on tap — always fresh, always rotating. To go with, pick the fresh, hand-formed burgers on a pretzel bun. The casual atmosphere includes plenty of TVs tuned to sports, making it just right for a Gateway-district beer break.
Comfy, cozy, and rich with vintage architectural detail, Civilization makes an ideal spot for reading, web-surfing, or just lingering with agreeable companions over a smooth cappuccino, a fresh muffin, or lunchtime soups and sandwiches.
Quickly becoming downtowners' favorite lunch stop, Josh Kabat's casual sandwich shop features almost a dozen meaty, Cleveland-themed creations. The Terminal, for example, combines Black Forest ham, brie, mustard and apricot jam in a soft 8-inch sub bun. Dining is mainly carryout, but a few tables accommodate those who can't wait to dig in.
Besides stocking such essentials as pet food and toothpaste, this urbane market includes a big wine department, a selection of food-fashionable gifts, and a well-stocked deli overseen by an in-house chef. Eat-in/carry-out options range from mac & cheese to freshly prepared sushi. For a final taste of something sweet, grab an oversized German-chocolate brownie.
This being Zack Bruell's fifth Cleveland restaurant, diners now know they can expect high-caliber service, an interior pulled from the pages of Architectural Digest, and a menu the size of Atlas Shrugged. What Bruell calls "modern French-American" might just as well be billed New Mediterranean, with nods to Morocco, France and Italy. In the end, the food is characteristically Bruellian: tidy stacks of meat and veg resting in an opulent sauce, diamond-cut by the acidity of lemon.
Since its relocation to palatial digs in Ohio City, Crop Bistro has traded its coziness for in-your-face fabulousness. But despite the soaring space, chef Steve Schimoler's menu remains as enticing and intimate as ever, filled with impeccable ingredients, intense flavors, and innovative techniques that place Crop among the best spots in the region. Cleverly conceived cocktails and a comprehensive wine list just add to the fun.
At Aureole in New York, chef Dante Boccuzzi snagged Michelin stars two years running. Back home in Cleveland, he has taken over the former Lockkeepers and injected it with a more casual sensibility. Working as he has in Italy, France and Asia, Boccuzzi incorporates elements of these cuisines into boldly flavored dishes like Thai-style mussels, house-made cavatelli and pomegranate-glazed duck. Full bar and wine list.
As at the other Dave's locations, the decor inside this cosmic sub shop is a shrine to the ’60s, full of rock references, hippie music, and good vibrations. The overstuffed subs rock too, built from top-notch ingredients piled inside a crisp-crusted Italian roll. The place is packed at lunch, carryout is strongly recommended and if you are pressed for time, calling ahead would be a grand idea.
This groovy little diner has grown into a neighborhood magnet, as well-loved for its dinner vibe as for its big portions and reasonable prices. Despite the impressive menu size, the kitchen rarely loses its way, turning out homey faves — everything from fluffy omelets to juicy burgers and tender pork chops — with reliable craftsmanship.
This sleekly outfitted restaurant and bar has a view like no other, overlooking the promenades of the elaborate, historic, and exquisitely restored Arcade. The glam setting, in combination with well-prepared breakfast and lunch fare, makes it a fine choice for travelers and downtown workers alike.
The eclectic, contemporary menu at this Tremont fixture is a good match for its shabby-chic decor; and somehow, dishes like bouillabaisse, seared duck breast, and sausage-and-goat-cheese rigatoni taste better when devoured 'neath the light of candles and lava lamps. Friendly staffers and a full bar are other reasons to pad on into this neighborhood gem.
This Irish bar in the heart of downtown features live music most weekends — primarily singer-songwriters and Irish acts. But it’s best known for having Guinness on tap and throwing one hell of a St. Paddy’s Day party.
Noisy and fun-loving, this 100-seat restaurant is part of the Corner Alley complex, a high-energy hangout featuring 16 lanes of bowling and a fashionable martini bar. With cheese here, bacon there, and deep-fried goodness nearly everywhere, spa cuisine this is not. But thanks to zesty flavors and often-imaginative preparation, the offerings still beat the standard bowling-alley lineup by a long shot.
Having worked at famed Nobu, chef Dante Boccuzzi had lofty aspirations when creating Ginko, his subterranean sushi restaurant that sits below the chef's eponymous Dante. As a result, Ginko is a paean to fish, most of it raw, some of it rolled, all of it exceptional. Diners seated at one of the two booths can also enjoy shabu shabu, Japanese-style fondue. Beer, wine, and sake are available.
The little sushi bar that could now tosses a mean lobster tail and steak on the hibachi. Wash everything down with a thimble of sake or a cold Kirin. And save room for some green tea ice cream.
106 total results

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