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The name given to the area comes from one of the previous owners of the property. His daughter, named Princess, liked to play on the sandstone ledges located on the property, thus the name "Princess Ledges." The beautiful ledges on the site become a fascinating site in the winter, as ice forms from springs flowing from the rock formations. This area is heavily wooded and offers an abundance of wildlife and wildflowers.

This 149-acre former fishing club was acquired by the Geauga Park District in 1993. Avid anglers continue to catch a wide variety of fish, including bass, bluegill, and northern pike. The three lakes and 40 acres of wetlands also attract beavers, great blue herons, red-shouldered hawks, turtles, and a wide variety of songbirds and migrating waterfowl. Beartown Lakes Reservation is an excellent spot for hiking, horseback riding, sledding, and cross-country skiing.

This 642-acre tract, primarily covered with a mature beech-maple forest, is bisected by Big Creek. Many species of neotropical songbirds migrate from equatorial rainforests to nest in Big Creek Park; wildlife watchers also enjoy spotting deer, turtles, beaver, and small woodland animals.

A major component of Big Creek Reservation is Big Creek Parkway, a refreshing alternative to the standard suburban commuter routes to Cleveland. The reservation runs parallel to Pearl Road from Valley Parkway to Brookpark Road and is located in Brooklyn, Parma, Parma Heights, Middleburg Heights, and Strongsville.

With nearly a half-million visitors each year, this may well be the most popular park in the Lorain County Metro Park system. The most notable feature is the Bridgeway Trail, a 3.5-mile, paved all-purpose trail that follows the Black River through its meanderings from Elyria to Lorain, spanning four city jurisdictions altogether.

Bradley Woods Reservation, located in North Olmsted and Westlake, is on a massive formation of Berea sandstone. The stone is easily seen in the old quarry sites located in various areas of the reservation.

>From the oak-hickory forests on the ridgetops to the cottonwoods, willows, and sycamores of Chippewa Creek's flat floodplain, Brecksville Reservation is a study of contrasts. The reservation is deeply cut by seven distinct gorges that have a wide variety of soil and sunlight conditions, fostering the growth of rare, unusual, and endangered plants.

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