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Film Capsules 

Opening and in theaters this week

Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore (PG) — Read review Friday at clevescene.com.

Charlie St. Cloud (PG-13) — Featured in this issue; read review Friday at clevescene.com.

Dinner for Schmucks (PG-13) — Read review Friday at clevescene.com.

The Girl Who Played With Fire (R) — Reviewed in this issue.

Inception (PG-13) — Christopher Nolan has already directed one unquestionable mind-fuck masterpiece: 2000's Memento. He can now add a second to his résumé. Inception goes so deep, so often, you'll want to watch it again immediately just to see if all the pieces add up. Even if they don't (but I bet they do), it's a visual feast of dreamlike splendor. Leonardo DiCaprio plays Cobb, an "extractor" who enters people's dreams to probe their innermost thoughts. He also carries a ton of personal baggage, which puts his faithful team (including Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Ellen Page) in constant danger. Cobb's latest and presumably last job is to plant an idea — yes, it works both ways — into the mind of a young corporation head (Cillian Murphy) who's taking over the family business. That's when Inception really kicks into action. Think too hard about what you're seeing onscreen and you'll likely burn out your brain — but that's exactly what Nolan (who also wrote the screenplay) wants. Just know that various levels of dream states are involved, and detachment from reality is necessary. Once you're settled in, you're ready for one of the year's smartest and most thrilling adventures. Buildings crumble, streets flood, and entire cities fold into themselves in this wondrous landscape. It's all mind-blowingly magnificent and spectacularly deep. (Michael Gallucci)

Salt (PG-13) — If Inception is the summer's brain-twisting action movie, Salt is its check-your-brain-at-the-door-and-enjoy-the-freakin'-ride alternative. There's a plot here (a mighty farfetched one about a CIA agent accused of being a Russian spy), but it's mostly secondary to the explosive set pieces. While interrogating a Russian defector, agent Evelyn Salt (Angelina Jolie) is told she is actually a Russian spy trained to assassinate the Russian president. Is she? Director Phillip Noyce piles on the possibility, especially after Evelyn goes on the run like Jason Bourne, dodging bullets, leaping onto speeding trucks, and kicking major ass. Jolie has become adept at playing tough gals, so once Evelyn hits the road with the CIA in hot pursuit, the movie rarely lets up. But Salt doesn't hold together as a story (Inception is more believable): The post-Cold War element is lukewarm, and the scenes with Liev Schreiber as her faithful boss are deadly boring. Too bad all that narrative gets in the way of the good stuff. (Gallucci)

Ramona and Beezus (G) — I loved Beverly Cleary's books so much when I was younger that I suffered the wrath of Mrs. Horn, the school librarian who deemed them "too easy" and would snatch them from me and replace them with something dull. Kids since 1950 have similarly embraced Cleary's wonderful children's novels about Henry Huggins, his neighbor Beezus (Beatrice) Quimby, and her mischievous little sister Ramona, a pest with an overactive imagination. Nine-year-old Ramona (Joey King) gets top billing in Elizabeth Allen's live-action adaptation of Cleary's Ramona and Beezus, falling into misadventures ranging from spilling paint all over a neighbor's Jeep to humiliating sister Beezus (Disney star Selena Gomez) in front of nascent heartthrob Henry (Hutch Dano). The movie tries, with mixed success, to update the Cleary universe with computer animation, cloying pop songs, teen romance, and Nickelodeon-style slapstick. But it deserves credit for incorporating a timely recession theme (Ramona's dad, endearingly played by John Corbett, loses his job) and capturing, as Cleary did, the angst of being a kid who's different. (Pamela Zoslov)

Despicable Me (PG) — The villains at the center of this amiable CGI movie are straight out of the James Bond playbook. After rival bad guy Vector begins to steal some of the planet's most notable landmarks, the borderline incompetent Gru hatches a plan to shrink the moon (it's basically a one-upmanship contest between these guys). He adopts three tiny orphan girls to help him, even though he knows as much about parenting as he does about taking over the world. It isn't long before Gru is squeezing in dance recitals and amusement park outings between world-domination plans. The great voice cast (Russell Brand, Jason Segal, Will Arnett, Kristen Wiig, and Julie Andrews) is headed by Steve Carell as the heavily accented and occasionally English-mangling Gru. The funny script is short on actual plot, but many scenes pop, thanks to the zippy animation and panoramic 3-D. And even if Despicable Me doesn't need a bunch of little yellow helium-voiced minions running around, they're a kick every time they're onscreen. (Gallucci)

The Sorcerer's Apprentice (PG) — Conceived to make your eyeballs feel like they're bouncing through a pinball machine for 90 minutes, The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a swollen special-effects blast that expands a classic segment from 1940's Fantasia to feature length. You remember Mickey and the marching brooms, right? Only here it's live action, with director Jon Turteltaub working from Michael Bay's gaudy playbook. Ever since the eighth century, good-guy wizard Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) has been looking for a chosen one to carry on the fight against an evil sorceress. In modern-day New York, Balthazar recruits nebbish physics major Dave (Jay Baruchel) for the job. Balthazar mentors clumsy Dave in such magical-martial arts as levitation, lighting fires, and hurling plasma balls. And there's not a moment to lose, since warlock Horvath (Alfred Molina) is on the attack, threatening to bring on a zombie armageddon. An obscenity-free script and Molina's hearty villainy are the only tangible Magic Kingdom touches in The Sorcerer's Apprentice — that and the awesome CGI, which brings to life the Chrysler Building's gargoyle filigree and the famous sculpted bull on Wall Street. Visually impressive? Sure. Magical? Not very. (Cassady)

Toy Story 3 (G) — For a studio as innovative and consistently terrific as Pixar, it's kind of odd that they're reaching into the Toy Story box for a third time. Not that we're complaining: The first Toy Story (and Pixar's first feature, from 1995) is a masterpiece of CGI storytelling. The 1999 sequel nearly tops it. The third outing achieves the near impossible: Toy Story 3 is the best of the bunch. This time, Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz (Tim Allen), and the gang are accidentally shipped to a daycare center as all-grown-up Andy gets ready for college. And things don't go well. The toys run into some sticky situations and a hierarchy led by the pink, vindictive, and strawberry-scented Lots-o'-Huggin' Bear (Ned Beatty). Like the other two movies in the series, Toy Story 3 expertly mixes poignancy and humor. It's the funniest, smartest, and most touching movie you'll see this summer. (Gallucci)

Grown Ups (PG-13) — Adam Sandler plays a high-powered Hollywood agent who reunites with some boyhood friends (including former SNL castmates Chris Rock and David Spade) at the funeral of their grade-school basketball coach. Every character comes with a joke: Rob Schneider's new-age boob has a thing for older — really older — women; Rock's Mr. Mom is pussywhipped by his wife and harridan of a mother-in-law; Kevin James is, well, fat. None of them gets appreciably funnier with repetition. Lazy, witless, and aggressively coarse, this could very well be Sandler's worst and most cringeworthy film (and, yes, I'm including The Water Boy and Bedtime Stories). I don't know what's more offensive here — the rancid, vulgar humor or the icky sentimentality that permeates every frame like a congealed layer of Transfat. Hopefully, Sandler and his pals had more fun making Grown Ups than anyone will have watching it. (Milan Paurich)

Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky (R) — The audience practically rioted during the first performance of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring in a Parisian opera house in 1913. The Russian composer knew he was taking a chance with the modern orchestration, foreign rhythms, and odd beats — not to mention the tribal dancers in Russian peasant patterns and wigs. Clothing designer Coco Chanel was at least one audience member who, rather than scandalized by Rite's raw energy, was intrigued. Having spent her career pushing modernity through the lines on her dresses and the shape of her hats, she knew a thing or two about risks. The gorgeous Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky opens with this failed performance. Seven years later, Coco (Anna Mouglalis) is grieving the loss of her lover, and Igor (Mads Mikkelsen) is a starving artist who lives in a tiny apartment with his four young children and wife, who is sick with consumption. Igor finally accepts Coco's offer to work and live with his family at her country villa outside of Paris. Mouglalis is almost cheerless in her role, but the elegance is all there. And she's a good match for Mikkelsen, who wears Igor's healthful habits of exercise and raw eggs for breakfast very well. And when the movie ends, it is with another performance, another gown of perfection, and another audience reaction. (Wendy Ward)

Cyrus (R) — Still not over a divorce that was finalized years ago, John (John C. Reilly) is invited to his ex-wife's engagement party, where he makes an ass of himself with help from a lot of Red Bull and vodka. When he steps outside to pee in the bushes, cute Molly (Marisa Tomei) sneaks a peek. "Nice penis," she tells him. And so begins John and Molly's relationship, which surprises John and proceeds smoothly until John meets Cyrus (Jonah Hill), Molly's 21-year-old son. John soon realizes why this sexy woman wants to go out with him: Cyrus is a dysfunctional mama's boy who provides some major cock-blocking to his mom's personal life. Cyrus is funny, but it never goes for big, obvious laughs. It's also a simmering pot of menace, with the scheming Cyrus stirring the mix. Hill plays this borderline sociopath as a ticking bomb of mommy and daddy issues. The devious look in his eyes, his condescending attitude toward John and Molly, and his passive-aggressive actions say it all. Cyrus can't quite sustain this balance for 90 minutes, and the end feels a bit like a copout. But this is a dark comedy that makes room for a little light. (Michael Gallucci)

The Karate Kid (PG) — This remake of the 1984 Ralph Macchio-Pat Morita kitsch classic (itself a Rocky rip-off) rethinks the clichés and bundles a spectacular Far East travelogue on the side. New Karate Kid on the block Dre Parker (Jaden Smith) arrives in Beijing with his single mom (Taraji P. Henson), who's relocated for business reasons from Detroit. Outgoing Dre runs afoul of Chinese boys from a mean-spirited kung-fu school, adding serial bullying to his culture shock. To Dre's rescue comes Mr. Han (a subdued Jackie Chan), the Parkers' taciturn handyman and a secret source of ancient kung-fu knowledge and philosophy. To end the bullying, Han mentors Dre for a tournament showdown against the bullies. The movie delivers on the master-disciple interplay and the dawning respect across races and generations that werealways the strength of the series. (Charles Cassady)

The Kids are All Right (R) — The Kids Are All Right finds an interesting balance between the revolutionary and the conventional. In a way, it's a fairly typical family comedy-drama. But it just so happens that the family is headed by two moms (Annette Bening and Julianne Moore). The movie is charming and slightly annoying, expertly made but a little too slick and enamored of its unconventionality. "He just seems so self-satisfied," says Nic, Bening's sharp-tongued doctor, after meeting Paul (Mark Ruffalo), the free-spirited restaurateur whose sperm donation fathered the kids she raises with wife Jules (Moore). She could be talking about the film, which simultaneously revels in and rails against political correctness. But this is not a lesbian movie designed to titillate; it's a human drama about relationships and evolving definitions of family. Ruffalo's woozy, beatific demeanor has seldom been used better. Bening is a kaleidoscope of toughness and vulnerability. And Moore is affecting as the conflicted Jules. Igor Jadire-Lillo's skillful cinematography caresses Bening's facial lines and Moore's freckles, underscoring another of the movie's endearing qualities: It's a romance about middle-aged people — not very glamorous, but beautiful nonetheless. (Pamela Zoslov)

Knight and Day (PG-13) — This is the kind of film that practically encourages ADD, cobbled together out of stray parts from a slew of mostly better movies. North by Northwest (the standard-bearer for this type of escapist fluff), Romancing the Stone, the Mission Impossible flicks, Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Groundhog Day, and even the under-loved Hudson Hawk are just a few of the titles liberally quoted here. The MacGuffin propelling Patrick O'Neill's connect-the-dots script is a super-strength new battery codenamed "The Zephyr." Rogue agent Roy Miller (Tom Cruise) wants to protect the contraption and its dweebish inventor (Paul Dano) from his former agency bosses (the overqualified Viola Davis and Peter Sarsgaard) and a slew of Euro weapons manufacturers. Cameron Diaz is the cutie Roy uses as a mule to help get through airport security then can't quite seem to shake. You'll forget most of the plot particulars before hitting the parking lot. (Paurich)

The Last Airbender (PG) — Disappointment in M. Night Shyamalan movies has become almost reflexive among fans, who bemoan the director's failure to match the success of his 1999 breakthrough film The Sixth Sense. Shyamalan's movies, though uneven and often reliant on twist endings, tend to be contemplative, with a spiritual component that seems to frustrate moviegoers seeking more obvious thrills. The Last Airbender, a live-action adventure film based on a Nickelodeon animated series, is likely to disappoint as well, since it emphasizes the narrative's cerebral elements over exciting action. The story centers on Aang (Noah Ringer), a preadolescent Airbender accepting his destiny as the reincarnated Avatar, the only person who can manipulate all four elements and maintain peace among the Air, Water, Earth, and Fire nations. (Zoslov)

Predators (R) — Screenwriter Robert Rodriguez conceived Predators as a sequel to the first two Predator movies. So it's more about man vs. Predator than Predator vs. Alien this time around. The plot centers on a group of soldiers trapped in a foreign jungle where the sun never sets. At first they fight among themselves, but they soon realize something is hunting them and they're better off putting aside their differences. So they rally around Royce (a beefed-up Adrien Brody), who establishes himself as the pack's leader. "It doesn't matter what happened or why," he tells them. "The only question is, How do we get out?" Turns out it ain't easy, especially when there's a bunch of bloodthirsty Predators hunting you down with heat-seeking weapons. The first half of the movie is fairly suspenseful, but once the Predators show up, the whole thing goes to hell. With their glowing eyes and infrared vision (not to mention their cloaking devices), they look like cheesy creatures from an old Star Trek episode. Brody is an OK action hero, but he's a bit stiff in the role, and the supporting cast (including a brief cameo by Laurence Fishburne) practically shows him up. (Jeff Niesel)

Standing Ovation (PG) — A group of teens work their skinny little butts off to enter a music-video contest. It's like Glee without Lea Michele. Or High School Musical without Zac Efron. Or a cash-in movie without famous people.

The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (PG-13) — Bella (Kristen Stewart) finally chooses between emo vampire Edward (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf/shape-shifter Jacob (Taylor Lautner) in the third chapter of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight saga. Directed by the gifted David Slade (30 Days of Night, Hard Candy), Eclipse is infinitely superior to last fall's pedestrian New Moon and is quite possibly the best, most stylish Twilight yet. Although the vapid Lautner continues to be a huge drain on the series (I've seen better acting in middle-school Christmas pageants), Slade proves that bigger can sometimes be better. This film's more extravagant budget and improved CGI effects and production values finally give the franchise the properly epic (read: Harry Potter-ish) feel it's been striving for all along. I just wish that the dialogue, most of it lifted directly from Meyer's books, weren't quite so tin-ear. (Paurich)

Winter's Bone (R) — After a meth-dealing deadbeat dad puts up the family home as bail and then disappears, his 17-year-old daughter hunts him down in the Ozark Mountains. Based on Lohan family adventures. Now playing at the Cedar Lee Theatre.

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