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Tuesday, October 20, 2009

10/25: Cleveland Chamber Symphony

Posted By on Tue, Oct 20, 2009 at 3:14 PM

Composer Jing Jing Luo’s life is straight out of a movie. After her father was killed during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, communist party chair Mao Zedong’s government imprisoned her in a labor camp in the Gobi Desert. When she was 16, she walked out. She then became a nurse’s aide until the government spotted her musical talent and sent her to the Shanghai Conservatory, where she studied piano and composition, as well as a couple of traditional Chinese instruments. She then won a Rockefeller fellowship, came to the U.S. and established a career as a composer. Since working as an adjunct instructor in the music department at Ashland University, she’s had stints with the Ohio State University and the Oberlin Conservatory. Her “Lagrimas Y Voces” (“Tears and Voices”) will have its world premiere in a concert by the Cleveland Chamber Symphony today. Flutist Sean Gabriel will perform the solo part. Also on the program are a string quartet by Steven Smith (who conducts the program) and Frank Wiley’s “For Alexander Calder.” It starts at 3:30 p.m. at the Cleveland Music School Settlement (11125 Magnolia Dr., 216.421.5806). Admission is free. — Michael Gill

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