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Monday, February 21, 2011

Morning Brew: Birds Dying, Heroin Killing, Josh Cribbs Ripped on Twitter, and Abe Lincoln's DNA Tested

Posted By on Mon, Feb 21, 2011 at 9:46 AM

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Good morning, Cleveland. Here's some stuff to read while you take a break from chiseling ice off your car windows.

— Thousands of duck and geese are mysteriously dying off the shores of Lake Erie. Scientists have no idea what's causing the deaths yet, but remind us that it's never too soon to panic. (WOIO)

— Heroin has become a widespread problem in Ohio suburbs. It's cheap, the natural next step once users become immune to the high of prescription drugs, and more available than you would think. (Cleveland.com)

— Josh Cribbs was at the NBA All Star Game last night and tweeted his support for "his boy" LeBron James. Clevelanders jumped all over Cribbs in response, hurling virtual Molotov cocktails in the kick returner's direction because no Cleveland athlete should vouch for King James. They should have been more upset that Cribbs basically sucked last year, but whatever. (NewsNet5)

— A National Geographic special airing tonight will investigate whether Abraham Lincoln had a rare form of cancer that would have killed him even if he had not been assassinated. A Cleveland Clinic doctor assisted in the research and testing of Lincoln's DNA. (Cleveland.com)

We'll be back momentarily.

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