Support Local Journalism. Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club.

Friday, February 5, 2021

Hot Chicken Takeover Announces New Strongsville Location, Downtown Delivery-Only Kitchen

Posted By on Fri, Feb 5, 2021 at 9:20 AM

click to enlarge HOT CHICKEN TAKOVER
  • Hot Chicken Takover
Since launching seven years ago as a weekend-only pop-up in Columbus, Hot Chicken Takeover has continued to expand its reach throughout the state. With the recent opening of its Westerville location, there now are four stores in Central Ohio. Crocker Park, the first shop outside Greater Columbus, opened in late 2019.

Next up for the Columbus-based restaurant that specializes in Nashville hot chicken is Strongsville, specifically the Royalton Collection development on N. Royalton. The goal is to open in April.



“We’re excited to be in Strongsville and we’re excited to keep growing in the
community,” states Joe DeLoss, Founder and CEO. “We have a growth strategy plan for Northeast Ohio that includes suburban and city center opportunities. This plan is really contingent on the availability of real estate.”

Originally, the new Northeast Ohio location was to open back in fall, but Covid pushed those plans back. Not surprisingly, the global pandemic has forced management to reconsider the design and operation of some of its newest stores, explains Liz Dickey, Marketing Director.

“This location will be configured differently from our Crocker Park location,” she says. “The dining room is smaller in square footage. We’ve had to switch to doing carry-out only since March and that has worked well for us, so we decided to design our new interior to mimic the current trend that we’re seeing.”

Come spring, Hot Chicken Takeover fans in Northeast Ohio will have a third location from which to order. In addition to Crocker Park and Strongsville, the company announced plans to open a delivery-only kitchen downtown. The site was selected to improve accessibility for customers.

Don’t expect the Crocker Park and Strongsville locations to be the last in Northeast Ohio, promises Dickey. There’s still plenty of growth planned for the Buckeye State.

“We’re definitely looking for other sites on the east side for next year,” she says. “The next two years we’ll really be focusing on Ohio: Cleveland and Columbus. We’ve looked at other cities outside Ohio, but we really want to grow here first.”

Tags: , , ,

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Cleveland Scene. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Cleveland Scene, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at news@clevescene.com.

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club


Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.


Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.


Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club for as little as $5 a month.

Read the Digital Print Issue

October 20, 2021

View more issues

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

Calendar

© 2021 Cleveland Scene: 737 Bolivar Rd., Suite 4100, Cleveland, OH 44115, (216) 505-8199
Logos and trademarks on this site are property of their respective owners.


Website powered by Foundation