February 03, 2015

19 Underwater Photos of Lake Erie Shipwrecks

Most of us visit Lake Erie for mid-summer barbecues or afternoons on the boat, but have you ever considered what lies beneath our Great Lake's surface? Some people have. In fact, whole communities have, such as the folks from Lake Erie Ship Wrecks, who have spent years diving and documenting their excursions in Lake Erie and beyond. We asked the Ship Wreckers, better known as Mike and Georgann Wachter, as well as one of their featured photographers, Vlada Dekina, if we could share some of their underwater images with our readers. Thankfully, they said yes. For additional info on Lake Erie dives, and any of the ship wrecks pictured here, visit eriewrecks.com and wrecksandreefs.com.

Scroll down to view images

Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club

At a time when local-based reporting is critical, support from our readers is essential to our future. Join the Cleveland Scene Press Club for as little as $5 a month

This unidentified barge rests about  145ft below the surface of Lake Erie. Photo credit: V. Dekina
This unidentified barge rests about 145ft below the surface of Lake Erie. Photo credit: V. Dekina
Front of the unidentified barge. Photo credit: V. Dekina
Front of the unidentified barge. Photo credit: V. Dekina
The wheel of the George Finnie which was discovered 90 feet below the lake's surface in 2000. Photo credit: V. Dekina
The wheel of the George Finnie which was discovered 90 feet below the lake's surface in 2000. Photo credit: V. Dekina
George Finnie deadeyes which were used to rig sails. Photo credit: V. Dekina
George Finnie deadeyes which were used to rig sails. Photo credit: V. Dekina
George Finnie. Photo credit: V. Dekina
George Finnie. Photo credit: V. Dekina
The John J. Boland was used to haul grain and other bulk loads across Lake Erie. She sank during a storm, taking four members of her 19-person crew with her. Photo credit: V. Dekina
The John J. Boland was used to haul grain and other bulk loads across Lake Erie. She sank during a storm, taking four members of her 19-person crew with her. Photo credit: V. Dekina
The Boland was lost on Oct. 5, 1932. Photo credit: V. Dekina
The Boland was lost on Oct. 5, 1932. Photo credit: V. Dekina
Inside the Boland steel steamer. Photo credit: V. Dekina
Inside the Boland steel steamer. Photo credit: V. Dekina
This unidentified wreck nicknamed "Crystal" by the photographer rests at 120 feet. Photo credit: V. Dekina
This unidentified wreck nicknamed "Crystal" by the photographer rests at 120 feet. Photo credit: V. Dekina
Crystal at 120 feet. Photo credit: V. Dekina
Crystal at 120 feet. Photo credit: V. Dekina