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Wednesday, March 20, 2019

'Lights Out Cleveland' Wants City to Shut Off Lights to Help Save Migrating Birds

Posted By on Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 2:11 PM

PHOTO BY LES CHATFIELD/FLICKR
  • Photo by Les Chatfield/Flickr
Ohio Lights Out is aiming to persuade big building owners throughout the state to turn off unnecessary lights at night. Not just to save energy (although that's a positive side effect), but to help reduce the amount of migrating birds colliding with buildings, which often leads to fatalities.

The majority of birds migrate at night to avoid predators and fly when the winds are usually less heavy. But especially when it's hazy, birds following city lights can get into trouble. Up to 1 billion birds die per year across the country after crashing into buildings, a recent study found, with thousands perishing or getting injured in Cleveland alone. 

The local initiative, Lights Out Cleveland, has partnered with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, the Cleveland Metroparks and others to make sure bird flight paths aren't hindered.

So far, 13 buildings throughout the city, including Cleveland City Hall and FirstEnergy Stadium, have agreed to follow the Lights Out Cleveland initiative by turning off bright signs, decorative outdoor lighting and workspace lights.

Learn more about 'Ohio Lights Out' right here.

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Islamic Center of Cleveland Opens New Free Health Clinic to Help Serve Uninsured

Posted By on Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 1:15 PM

PHOTO VIA ISLAMIC CENTER OF CLEVELAND/FACEBOOK
  • Photo via Islamic Center of Cleveland/Facebook
What was once a storage facility on the Islamic Center of Cleveland campus in Parma has been transformed into a new free health clinic for all.

Quietly open now for the past couple weeks, the Cleveland Ibn Sina Clinic was developed by the Northeast Ohio Muslim community to provide health services for any person who is uninsured or underinsured.

"Healthcare is not a privilege for some, it is a fundamental human right,’ is not just a slogan but the very foundation of our mission,” Dr. Mansoor Ahmed, Medical Director of CISC, said in a statement. He is joined by more than 20 local physicians who have signed on to volunteer their time at the clinic.

“There are far too many people in our communities who do not have the medical coverage they need and are reluctant to seek the medical care that they need," Ahmed said. "This must change and by joining the ranks of the Ohio Association of Free Clinics, we want to do our part to realize the dream of everyone having the same healthcare services offered to them, as any other human being.”

The clinic (6055 W. 130th St.) is officially hosting its grand opening Wed., March 27 at 5 p.m. with a ribbon cutting ceremony and open house where people can tour the clinic and mosque. After that, the clinic will be open on weekends from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., taking walk-ins and appointments alike.

Call 440-644-0581 to make an appointment or for more information.

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The Cleveland Metroparks Zoo Just Welcomed Its First Sloth Bear Cub in 30 Years

Posted By on Wed, Mar 20, 2019 at 10:52 AM

PHOTO COURTESY CLEVELAND METROPARKS ZOO
  • Photo Courtesy Cleveland Metroparks Zoo
The first sloth bear cub born at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo in 30 years arrived January 14, officials announced today.

The furry newborn is reportedly healthy, as are its first-time parents. The cub is currently learning to walk and is sticking to its mother's side outside of public view for now.

While the baby is just 6 pounds, sloth bears run up to 300 pounds, preferring to feast on things like termites, honey and fruit. The shaggy-coated sloth bear, which is native to India and Nepal, is considered a vulnerable species.

At this time, the new sloth bear is nameless and a public naming contest, which the zoo is fond of doing for its newborns, has no set date.

The zoo also recently welcomed a baby howler monkey and baby rhino, which are now on display.  Sign up for Scene's weekly newsletters to get the latest on Cleveland news, things to do and places to eat delivered right to your inbox.

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Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Stomp, Spikey, Tank, Tricky or Trike? Help Tri-C Select the Name of its Triceratops Mascot

Posted By on Tue, Mar 19, 2019 at 2:33 PM

trike.jpg
Word from the communications desk at Tri-C is that the college is actively designing a costumed mascot to "tromp around at campus and community events."

The mascot needs a name, of course, and Tri-C is inviting the community to help make this all-important selection. As the local outlet following mascot developments of every sort, we are here to promote the vote. Voting closes on Friday, so pick one of the following five names at this link as soon as possible.)

Descriptions below provided by Tri-C.

(Following the success of "Gritty" in Philadelphia, we're partial to Tricky, a name which evidently "lends itself to a number of potential signature moves." (!!!) Tricky the Trike's got a nice ring.)

We also note — as a word of caution? — that the above outline bears a striking resemblance to Barney's Baby Bop.)

STOMP:
Stomp conjures the impression of a large, prehistoric animal’s footfalls in a primeval forest, and it commands notice. It’s easy and fun to say, especially for children, and it could also lend the mascot a signature move.

SPIKEY:
The name Spikey refers to the three horns — one on the nose, two on top of the head — that are the triceratops’ namesake. Plucky and spry, Spikey is up for any challenge, but don’t poke the Triceratops. Spikey didn’t get the name for no reason.

TANK:
Big. Powerful. Imposing. If you are the enemy, a fierce, frightening weapon of war that can master any terrain; if you are not the enemy, probably the safest place to be. A tank’s defining feature is its durability.

TRICKY:
Tricky, like the Triceratops itself, is a pun on Tri-C. Cunning, crafty, sly, wily, the mascot named Tricky is one that comes with a bearing and behavior that can entertain and delight. The names also lends itself to a number of potential signature moves.

TRIKE:
Trike is shorthand for Triceratops, used everywhere from the scientific community to video games. It subliminally suggests “three,” the number of horns on the triceratops, because Trike is also shorthand for tricycle, or any bike on three wheels.

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Details of the 2018 J.R. Smith Soup-Throwing Incident Revealed

Posted By on Tue, Mar 19, 2019 at 2:07 PM

GAME SCREEN SHOT
  • Game screen shot
ESPN's David Jacoby, in an interview with former Cavalier shooting coach Damon Jones, learned additional details of the infamous soup-throwing incident involving J.R. Smith in March, 2018.

That J.R. Smith was angered with Jones and hurled chicken tortilla soup in his direction was known. Jacoby learns from Jones that both the soup and the bowl were hurled, and that it was fresh out of the pot, in fact the first bowl out of the pot.

"It was hot as hell," Jones said.

The soup incident became a viral meme during the Cavaliers drama-filled 2017-2018 campaign, the final season with LeBron James. J.R. Smith, still under contract with the Cavs, has not been with the team for most of the season.

See the relevant interview clip here.

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EPA Declares It's Safe to Eat Fish Caught Out of Cuyahoga River, If It's Once a Month

Posted By on Tue, Mar 19, 2019 at 1:19 PM

PHOTO VIA SAM ALLARD
  • Photo via Sam Allard
The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has proclaimed that fish caught in the Cuyahoga River are now safe to eat.

The announcement is a year or so in the making, as the Ohio EPA previously requested that the federal EPA lift their restrictions after fish tissue samples showed significant health improvements. The U.S. EPA acquiesced and eased restrictions on fishing from the Gorge Dam to Lake Erie.

The EPA now recommends that if you catch fish in that area, only consume in accordance with general state guidelines, which essentially suggests one meal per month.

“This is an example of the progress that can be achieved when you collaborate and dedicate resources to improving the quality of water in our state,” Gov. Mike DeWine said in a statement. “We need to continue to invest in our water resources so that we can see additional improvements.” Although incredibly pro-environment on this issue, DeWine is also vocally pro-fracking and has dodged questions on climate change.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the last Cuyahoga River fire, which Sustainable Cleveland is celebrating with events like "More Green, Less White: Diversity in the Environmental Movement" and the Water Lantern Festival. (Their motto? "Celebrating our river, igniting our future." The cheekiness is noted, and appreciated.)

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Beto O'Rourke Does NOT Want to Take Away Your AR-15!

Posted By on Tue, Mar 19, 2019 at 11:06 AM

Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19). - SAM ALLARD / SCENE
  • Sam Allard / Scene
  • Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19).
The joke at Gino's Cento Anno, a blue-collar dive on the south and windward side of Cleveland's industrial valley where Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke made a pit stop Monday, was that two hours before his scheduled arrival, the TVs were all playing Fox News. By 3:30 p.m., the planned start time for O'Rourke's remarks, they'd been switched to CNN. And by 4:00 p.m., right before the erstwhile punk rocker and Texas Senate candidate began to gesticulate before a jam-packed crowd, they'd been tuned to MSNBC.

[GOP's STEVE KING SHARES MEME OF MODERN-DAY CIVIL WAR], the chyron read, as Beto was welcomed by Cuyahoga County Democratic Chair Shontel Brown. Hopped-up members of the crowd, chanting "BAY-to, BAY-to, BAY-to," were coaxed by frantic, Patagonia-vested campaign volunteers to please chant "BEH-to, BEH-to, BEH-to."

"They keep moving to the Left," a wisecracking cameraman observed above the din, nodding to the TVs.

Beto's political movement is less clear, in large part because his initial position is still somewhat vague. But in a high-energy campaign speech framed as an in-person introduction to local voters, and in answers to questions from the crowd, he presented much as he did on the Texas trail: an "authentic" charismatic Gen-Xer who absolutely loves Rock 'n' Roll and wants to make America a better place. O'Rourke spent 20 minutes earlier in the day at the Rock Hall, in fact, and opened his speech with a celebration of the ingenuity of America's musicians.

No one could argue with the things this tall, lean man said he wanted: affordable trips to the Doctor for everybody; a fairer criminal justice system; humane immigration policies that welcome refugees and don't lock children up in cages; a belief in science (!) and the need for bold action on climate change, etc.

But the criticism from the Left that O'Rourke is a bit of a nothingburger — "neither a bold progressive nor a distinguished legislator" — was difficult to dispel on first blush. He advocated for very few specific policies, though he did gesture toward the full legalization of marijuana and a bunch of stuff concerning "the VA," and in many areas where Democratic candidates have staked out aggressive progressive positions, he proposed what might be deemed "pragmatic" lesser measures. 

On gun control, for example, speaking to a cohort of Moms Demand Action attendees in their trademark red shirts, O'Rourke said he wanted universal background checks — obvs — but then said something extremely weird and contradictory.

He talked about what a bad idea it is to have military-grade assault weapons in our communities. These are weapons, he said, that "could blow a hole out of your back so large, destroy the insides of your systems so much, that you'll bleed to death before [a doctor] can save your life."

O'Rourke warned the crowd that what he was about to espouse was a "much more difficult" issue than something palatable like universal background checks. It was this: "If you own an AR-15, I don't want to take it from you. Keep it. Use it responsibly. All I'm saying is that we don't need to sell any more of them in our communities."

What? 

O'Rourke's from Texas, "a responsible, proud gun-owning state." And he said there's "nothing wrong with" gun ownership for hunting, collecting, etc. "In fact, there's so much right with the way we take that responsibility seriously." And yet, what a lame non-stance. It's no surprise that "use your assault weapons responsibly" didn't quite generate the same applause as, "I believe in a woman's right to choose." And why would it? He'd just spent an impassioned minute-and-a-half talking about what a senseless and irresponsible death-machine an AR-15 is. 

On health care, he doesn't want Medicare for All, necessarily. He just wants it to be a bit more affordable, maybe by putting the Medicare option on the public exchanges for people who don't have, or aren't happy with, their employer insurance. On college affordability, he doesn't want free public college, necessarily. He wants to refinance student loans at lower rates. 

When asked about the structure of the Supreme Court, he literally threw out a few rhetorical questions — Do we let an equal number of current Democratic and Republican justices select new members? Do we expand the body? Do we impose term limits? — and said he was partial to the option (term limits) that had generated the most applause.

But the Gino's crowd was largely receptive. (What he proposed would be improvements!) The chatter among attendees before Beto arrived, though, seemed to describe curiosity more than ardent support. Given the current occupant of the White House, local Democratic voters are ready to be energized by national politics. And honestly only upon review did the candidate's wishy-washy positions become clearer (other than the AR-15 comment, which was instantly a head-scratcher). In the moment, and in the excitement of the crowd, he sounded courageous and idealistic and hoarse from the fervor of his beliefs. He was a handsome, sweating politician in peak physical shape who had no qualms whatsoever about repeatedly name-dropping Sherrod Brown for the Cleveland crowd. And people were enjoying themselves. 

Even the Gino's regulars, even the blue-collar Cuyahoga County "Democrats" who prefer Fox News, sipped their domestics approvingly now and again. 

Shontel Brown warming up the crowd. / Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19). - SAM ALLARD / SCENE
  • Sam Allard / Scene
  • Shontel Brown warming up the crowd. / Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19).
Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19). - SAM ALLARD / SCENE
  • Sam Allard / Scene
  • Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19).
"I don't want to take away your AR-15s! Use them responsibly!" / Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19). - SAM ALLARD / SCENE
  • Sam Allard / Scene
  • "I don't want to take away your AR-15s! Use them responsibly!" / Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19).
Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19). - SAM ALLARD / SCENE
  • Sam Allard / Scene
  • Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19).
Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19). - SAM ALLARD / SCENE
  • Sam Allard / Scene
  • Beto O'Rourke at Gino's in Cleveland, (3/18/19).
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